2018 NFL Draft: Picks 136-140

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136 Panthers: OLB Marquis Haynes

Analysis
STRENGTHS
Haynes is a terrific overall athlete, showing the explosive burst, balance and lateral agility to play at the line of scrimmage or in space. While lacking the girth to remain at defensive end, he shows surprising upper body strength, pushing much larger opponents deep into the pocket on effective bull rushes and generating big collisions due to his closing speed and physicality, often ripping at the ball or twisting ballcarriers as he makes the tackle. Haynes recorded three forced fumbles every year at Mississippi for a career total of 12 - among the highest marks in the country. Haynes' best attribute is his initial burst off the ball, especially out of the three point stance. He fires out of his stance to cross the face of tackles and become an immediate threat to the quarterback, showing enough flexibility to dip under the reach of would-be blockers to scrape the corner. He wasn't asked to drop into coverage often at Ole Miss but shows the balance and agility to handle the transition, flipping his hips quickly to change direction and accelerating smoothly downfield with above average speed, even among linebackers. -- Rob Rang 2/1/2018

WEAKNESSES
Haynes starred as a defensive end but he lacks the frame to remain at the point of attack with narrow hips and relative toothpicks for legs - at least among edge rushers. While a physical tackler, Haynes shows limited strength and technique with his hands to disengage from blockers once they've latched on, including against tight ends. Far too often blockers are able to control Haynes in the running game, with backs rushing right past him. The question of Haynes' projection to a more traditional linebacker role is further complicated by the fact that too often his motor runs on idle when it comes to lateral and downfield pursuit, lacking the heat-seeking missile mentality coaches expect from linebackers. - Rob Rang 2/1/2018

COMPARES TO
Barkevious Mingo, Colts - Boating explosive speed and a svelte 6-4, 239 pound frame that blockers couldn't seem to get a grip on, Mingo was one of the more feared edge rushers in the SEC at LSU. Unfortunately, his lack of functional strength has made the transition to the NFL much more difficult with the former No. 6 overall pick (by Cleveland) recording just nine sacks over his first five seasons.

IN OUR VIEW
Haynes is one of the true boom or bust picks of the 2018 draft. If allowed to simply pin his ears back and rush the quarterback, he possesses the explosive burst and tackling power to make an immediate impact in the NFL, just as he did at Ole Miss. Make no mistake, however, Haynes is a bit of a one trick pony whose limited size and functional strength could make it difficult for him to duplicate his success at the next level. The fact that Haynes was held without a single tackle against Alabama in 2017 will not go unnoticed by scouts.

137 Cowboys: TE Dalton Schultz

Analysis
STRENGTHS
Big-boned with a moldable frame. Mean-spirited blocker. Looks to engage defenders and run his feet to create movement. Uses body angles to seal outside run lanes. Square blocking base to hold up in pass protection. Smooth release and quickly finds his top route speed. Reliable hands to secure catches in a crowd. Competes with a finishing mentality as a pass-catcher and blocker. Experienced in a pro-style scheme and blocking inline won’t be a new concept. Comes from a program known for producing NFL-quality tight ends. – Dane Brugler 1/21/2018

WEAKNESSES
Needs to continue and develop his strength. Lack of core power diminishes his sustain skills. Leans into blocks and loses balance, allowing defenders to dispose of him. Head ducker, falling off blocks. Inconsistent results as a second-level blocker. Bland at the top of routes. Needs to improve his route leverage to get defenders leaning. Lacks sudden athleticism to create spacing. Limited creativity after the catch. Not a big-play threat with only one career catch over 25 yards. Below average career production with only 55 receptions. – Dane Brugler 1/21/2018

IN OUR VIEW: In the mold of several Stanford tight ends before him, Schultz lacks a true distinguishing trait with ordinary athleticism and strength, but he is assignment sound and tough and can be an asset for a NFL offense.

Round 5:

138 Packers: OG Cole Madison

Analysis
…STRENGTHS
Good overall weight distribution given that he gained approximately 75 pounds since signing with Washington State as a former prep tight end. Basketball background is clear, as Madison shows good initial quickness, lateral agility and balance to shuffle and mirror rushers in pass protection. Generally plays with good knee bend, showing the core flexibility and strength to anchor effectively. Does not rely on an initial punch, showing patience, poise and strong hands to latch onto opponents and keep them in front of him. Quick enough to turn and seal opponents in the running game and shows leg drive and flashes some nastiness to move defenders off the line when asked to do so (rarely in this pass-oriented offense). Good agility to climb to the second level and adjust to moving targets. Very durable player with 39 consecutive starts on his resume - all at right tackle. -- Rob Rang 12/28/2017

WEAKNESSES
Played in a shotgun-heavy, pass-oriented offense that rarely asked him to block out of the three-point stance. Struggles with pad level, at times, and lacks the elite upper body strength to control defenders when he loses the leverage battle. Did a better job of handling outside speed than edge rushers doubling back inside on counter-moves. Needs to do a better job with tandem and double-team blocks, too often losing rushers in the B gap (Utah, Washington - 2017). - Rob Rang 12/28/2017

COMPARES TO: Mitchell Schwartz, Chiefs - Just as Madison likely will be, Schwartz was stereotyped by some as a by-product of a pass-happy Pac-12 offense when he left California. He has since proven well-worthy of the third round selection (by Cleveland) in 2012, starting all 95 games of his NFL career thus far and taking his game to another level in the West Coast Offense-based scheme utilized in Kansas City.

IN OUR VIEW: Through hard work, Madison developed into one of the better right tackles in the Pac-12 over the past four seasons. He possesses the size and agility NFL scouts are looking for but is more of a technician who relies on positioning and his quickness than the powerful, glass-eating earth-mover some clubs expect at the strongside tackle position.

139 Giants: DT RJ McIntosh

Analysis
STRENGTHS
Already possesses an imposing frame and still has room to grow. Sports broad shoulders and relatively wide hips with good overall weight distribution, including thick limbs. Flashes impressive initial quickness for his size, firing off the ball and showing the spatial awareness and flexibility to get skinny and split gaps. Good upper body strength and hand usage, flashing the ability stack and shed blockers at the point of attack. Light on his feet for a big man, showing good agility and acceleration to track down ball-carriers, including downfield due to good effort in pursuit. Generally keeps an eye on the ball, showing awareness of passing lanes and getting his big mitts up to bat down balls at the line of scrimmage. Effective open field tackler, breaking down well and using his length to trip up ball carriers seemingly out of his grasp. Has shown steady improvement in three seasons with his best football potentially ahead of him... Good durability to this point with no known injuries of concern. -- Rob Rang 1/29/2018

WEAKNESSES
Highly inconsistent with his pad level, too often standing up as he rushes forward and losing the leverage battle, showing just average balance and core strength when he does so and getting knocked to the turf. Shows good competitiveness in pursuit but needs to show more urgency in getting back up when initially defeated, appearing almost resigned to losing on that snap. Turns his back to the ball with a choppy spin move that leaves him guessing where the ball is headed. - Rob Rang 1/29/2018

COMPARES TO
Corey Peters, Cardinals - Like the 6-3, 305 pound Peters (the 83rd overall pick in 2010 by Atlanta), McIntosh possesses the combination of quickness, strength and awareness to earn Day Two consideration. If he is match Peters' long NFL career, however, McIntosh must complement his physical gifts with greater focus to the intricacies of the position.

IN OUR VIEW
McIntosh was one of the few defensive tackles to give Notre Dame star Quenton Nelson some problems but for all of the highlights he put on tape this season, there were plenty of ugly snaps, as well with the Miami defender too often getting knocked down and completely out of plays. Just three years removed from high school, McIntosh has the upside to get excited about, with a Day Two pick warranted. He is currently more flash than finished product, however, and may need to impress in interviews (and get strong endorsements from Miami's coaching staff) to be selected this high.

140 Raiders: DT Maurice Hurst

Analysis
STRENGTHS
Surges off the snap with explosive get-off and power. Routinely the first defender to move off the snap. Body control and hip flexibility to sidestep, swim and penetrate without losing speed. Easy redirection skills for a man his size. Broad shoulders and upper body thickness. Raw strength to tear through the shoulder of blockers. Shock in his hands with the placement to control the point of attack. Doesn’t have an “off” hand. Punishing tackler. Backfield instincts to quickly find and force his way to the football. Well-versed with multiple defensive line techniques. Two career blocked kicks. Competes with a chip – doesn’t have a relationship with his father, but wears No. 73 because his father wore No. 37. Works hard to create and maintain a strong bond with his teammates. Four-time Academic All-Big Ten honoree and graduated with a degree in sport management. – Dane Brugler 12/30/2017

WEAKNESSES
Lacks ideal bulk for an interior player, especially in his lower body. Only average length. Base tends to narrow in the run game. Comes off the ball with low pad level, but plays taller as the rep continues. Relies on initial movements to win the rep and needs to develop his countermeasures. Times up the snap well, but also guilty of his share of offsides penalties. Finds himself too far upfield at times, selling out for the sack. Only one season as a full-time starter. – Dane Brugler 12/30/2017

COMPARES TO: Warren Sapp, Tampa Bay Buccaneers – Like Sapp, Hurst doesn’t have the size or girth that stands out, but once the tape rolls, the initial quickness to attack gaps and flood the pocket. Sapp built a hall of fame career with that first step burst and Hurst’s quick momentum off the snap is what makes him a handful for blockers.

IN OUR VIEW: The top-rated senior interior defensive line prospect in the 2018 class, Hurst has the initial surge of quickness and power to break the rhythm of the blockers. His ball recognition and competitive hunger are also NFL-ready traits, making him ideally-suited as one-gapping defensive tackle in an aggressive scheme.

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