Wait for Facts Before Passing Judgment on Buffalo Bills Star LeSean McCoy

Running back faces serious allegations of child abuse, but others in spotlight have been falsely accused

If we learned anything over the past dozen years from the Duke lacrosse case, in which a woman falsely claimed she was raped by members of the team, it was the importance of making sure allegations aren't blindly accepted as facts. People pounced on the so-called entitled rich kids despite little evidence. And they were wrong.

Three years ago, Patrick Kane was falsely accused of rape in a case that was littered with holes. Kane said from the start that he did nothing wrong, and there was little evidence to the contrary, but it didn’t stop people from believing he committed a heinous crime. Turns out, they were wrong, too.

So how about we let things play out with LeSean McCoy?

McCoy is no saint, but people shouldn't be quick to convict him in the Court of Public Opinion after he had another serious allegation levied against him, this time by the mother of his 6-year-old son. In court papers filed Tuesday, Stephanie Maisonet supported previous claims by McCoy's an ex-girlfriend that he beat the child during custody visits.

“Our son would cry hysterically whenever he had to spend time with (LeSean) McCoy,” Maisonet said in the affidavit. “Our son would cry even harder if he knew that Delicia Cordon was not going to be present during (LeSean) McCoy’s parenting time. … I feel like I am sending our son to a monster every two weeks.”

“It’s ridiculous,” McCoy said Wednesday at the Bills’ practice facility. “I love my son. Anybody that knows me or has seen me around my boy, they know the type of relationship we have. I can’t really speak on it. It’s ridiculous. We’ll see what happens.”

McCoy’s response was expected. If he did beat the child, he wasn’t going to admit as much in a post-practice interview session while the Bills prepared to play the Minnesota Vikings on Sunday. Common sense suggests he wouldn’t – and shouldn’t – cop to a crime that he didn’t commit.

The latest accusation against McCoy came after Stephanie Maisonet, the mother of his son, filed an affidavit in connection with a lawsuit filed by former girlfriend Delicia Cordon. Cordon is suing McCoy in civil court, claiming she was vulnerable in an unsafe environment that contributed to her being beaten in a home invasion at his residence in Atlanta.

NFL Network has since reported he would not be charged in that case.

Maisonet’s accusation Tuesday and McCoy’s denial Wednesday are just that until there’s evidence – or a lack thereof – proving one side. The running back has not been charged with a crime. He’s not likely to be charged based solely on accusations made by former girlfriends.

This much is certain: Someone is lying.

One troubling aspect in this case is Maisonet supporting Cordon after initially supporting McCoy as a character reference. Shortly after the alleged home-invasion, an Instagram post from Maisonet’s account claimed he never beat his son.

“FALSE NEWS…” the post said. “My son has never been abuse (sic) NEVER. My son is very love (sic) by his dad my son never came back to me with any signs of abuse trust me We speak on the regular when he is with his dad NEVER ANY SIGNS . Why she would involved (sic) a 6 Year old in her drama I’m not sure but I ain’t gonna let that happen.”

Maisonet has since said she allowed a friend of McCoy’s to access her account and post the message. She said that she regrets backing McCoy initially but did so in exchange for custody and allowing him to enroll in school in Florida. In flipping to the side of his ex-girlfriend, it raises questions about her credibility.

If she knew McCoy was abusing the boy, as she said, why did she continue to place him in the care of a "monster," as she called him? Did she call the police? Did she suggest he get counseling?

The case is loaded with unanswered questions.

Is she a caring mother fearing her child’s safety? Would she do anything for the sake of improving the child’s situation? Is she partnering with Cordon and targeting McCoy for any personal or financial reasons? Does she have a vendetta against him?

What kind of human being would do such a thing to a child? What kind of human beings would make such serious claims that weren’t true?

All questions need to be answered before drawing a conclusion about McCoy and the two women. We’re talking about a major allegation, one that should neither be neither dismissed nor accepted until the evidence is compiled and examined.

Until proven otherwise, it’s their words against his words.

Sadly, we may never know the truth.

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